Information ausblenden

TonyPizza´s Metal Kompendium

Dieses Thema im Forum "Musik produzieren" wurde erstellt von TonyPizza, 21.05.17.

  1. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    Aber obacht, das wird hier komplett aus Musiker Sicht dargestellt. Man kann nur vermuten wie viel/wenig da die Produzenten die Finger im Spiel hatten.

    BTW ist die Snare auf "Under The Influence" der Pantera Snare verdammt ähnlich. Zeit für etwas tiefgreifendere Recherche :)
     
    Glutamatjunkie, Andaraginga und muffy bedanken sich.
  2. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
  3. NuckChorris

    NuckChorris

    Registriert seit:
    26.07.17
    Punkte:
    1.596
    1596
    Zuletzt bearbeitet: 08.09.19
  4. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
     
    heretic208 bedankt sich.
  5. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    Kurz und knackig, aber sehr informativ :)

     
  6. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    gute nacht

     
    Synophon bedankt sich.
  7. Rocky Balboa

    Rocky Balboa

    Registriert seit:
    25.12.18
    Punkte:
    681
    681
  8. Rocky Balboa

    Rocky Balboa

    Registriert seit:
    25.12.18
    Punkte:
    681
    681
  9. Kosaken-Kaffee

    Kosaken-Kaffee Überschätzte Legende

    Registriert seit:
    04.10.16
    Punkte:
    46.869
    46869
    In der Hölle schmoren du sollst, Rocky Balboa. :D
     
    Zuletzt bearbeitet: 17.09.19
    Rocky Balboa und diagnostix bedanken sich.
  10. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    Bei Gitarren Kabeln haut das nicht hin. Dort spielt die Kapazität tatsächlich eine große Rolle.
     
  11. muffy

    muffy Hippie

    Registriert seit:
    18.12.16
    Punkte:
    32.691
    32691
    Der Whisky-Lüning hat wohl zu jedem Thema was zu käsen...
     
    holgi und diagnostix bedanken sich.
  12. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
  13. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    " So the beginning of Spectrasonics was purely about creating sounds for hardware samplers?

    Yes. We were blessed to work with Hans Zimmer and some other great people right at the beginning..."

    Ich habs gewusst!!! Hab aber die Zimmer sounds nie auf den roland Geräten/CDs gefunden, aber es war vom selben Sound Designer
     
  14. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
  15. MountainKing

    MountainKing

    Registriert seit:
    04.03.06
    Punkte:
    21.214
    21214
    TonyPizza bedankt sich.
  16. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
  17. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
     
    heretic208 bedankt sich.
  18. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    Bob fucking Clearmountain, Huart sitzt da wie ein keiner Schuljunge, klasse :)

     
    Zuletzt bearbeitet: 15.10.19 um 17:34 Uhr
    heretic208 bedankt sich.
  19. Ethersis

    Ethersis Individualist

    Registriert seit:
    06.04.15
    Punkte:
    9.039
    9039
  20. TonyPizza

    TonyPizza Themenersteller

    Registriert seit:
    11.01.12
    Punkte:
    31.487
    31487
    hab noch was schönes gefunden:

    While lying awake in bed a few nights ago, my body refusing to go to sleep because of the Jet Lag I forced on it, I decided to pick up my copy of Extremity Retained and opened it to a random page. I wasn’t planning on reading for long (I was really just looking for something to tire my brain out), but as it turned out, this particular interview with Jim Morris of Morrisound Studios was so interesting I couldn’t stop until I finished it.



    Jim talks about the first wave of extreme metal albums they created there, a lot of them in collaboration with now legendary producer Scott Burns. He gives very cool insight into the techniques they used when recording and mixing, as well as the problems they had to overcome. And I’m sure the most common of these problems might not be what you’re expecting:

    […] some drummers would come into the studio and be unable to perform their own songs. They were playing like half a song, and then they couldn’t play anymore. They were playing just beyond their level of competence. So, in order to get the record done in time, you couldn’t send the guy back again and say, ‘Do it again, do it again.’ We were using samplers to do the kick and snare replacements […] The trick was to get all the drums to ‘speak.’ The blast beat especially was a challenge, mostly because they were often not played correctly. It was very difficult, and 90% of the drummers were not doing it correctly. I remember suggesting that a click track be used […] if I could record these drums to a click, then all of the drum replacements would be so much easier. […] But it really couldn’t be done; I mean, the guys just were not sophisticated enough in their art form yet to get to the point where they could play to a click track. That took years.

    Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaamn, son! Although he never gives any names, I can’t say I’m really surprised about this. What I’m extremely entertained and bewildered by is how they dealt with this type of situation:

    “[…] we were all doing it on a 2” tape at the time and there was no computer editing, so I developed a technique using a MIDI-sequencer locked to the time code and a calculator, and we would sit there and calculate the distance in milliseconds between snare drum hits, ask the drummer how many kick drum hits are supposed to be between them, then figure out in milliseconds how far the kick drums were apart, and then we had to type them in. This was not visual, it was all in DOS – we were doing this before Windows. We had a guy working for us named Brian Benscoter – we called him ‘Super Brian,’ because he is a genius level IQ-type guy […] we would get Brian to sit there with the calculator, and he would sit there for the rest of the night just calculating kick drums and putting them in, because the drummers just could not play them. It was not necessarily anyone’s fault; it was more that they just were not really prepared.”

    WHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAT

    “[…] a lot of the growing reliance on technology stemmed from shrinking album budgets. Back in the late 1980s, we would spend an entire day just testing out different drum sounds. […] The recording budgets are so low now that even if you do it in your own house, sometimes the drum replacement thing is the only way to do it, so then you end up using BFD or Superior Drummer as your drummer instead of your own drummer. […] I mean, we were not doing anything that bigger producers like Bob Clearmountain had not already done with Bruce Springsteen. We were just doing it louder and heavier and faster, with lower budgets. […] There was just no other way to do it at the time, because the budgets started shrinking, yet the quality had to be the same.”
     
    muffy, Mit Senf, holgi und eine weitere Person bedanken sich.